the-practice-of-buddhismOutside of Asia, many people develop an interest of more and more important in Buddhism. In the Western world, many read about Buddhism and there are now many good books on Buddhism.

Buddhism taught in the books is just a taste and it is important now to move from theory to practice.

1) What is the practice of Buddhism?

We always hear Buddhists say they “engaged Buddhism.”

First, the “practice” refers most often to a specific activity such as meditation or chant that is done every day. For example, a person practicing Jodo Shu (Pure Land) Japanese Nembutsu recites every day. Zen and Theravada Buddhist practice bhavana (meditation) every day.

First, the “practice” refers most often to a specific activity such as meditation or chant that is done every day. For example, a person practicing Jodo Shu (Pure Land) Japanese Nembutsu recites every day. Zen and Theravada Buddhist practice bhavana (meditation) every day.

2) Where practice Buddhism?

Buddhists have altars. What’s inside an altar varies from one sect to another, but found in the majority status of Buddha, candles, flowers, incense and a small bowl of water. Take care of the altar is also taking care of the practice.

3) How to practice Buddhism?

Buddhist practice also includes the practice of the Buddha’s teaching, especially “The eight steps to happiness.” The eight steps are organized into three sections: wisdom, ethics and mental discipline. The practice of meditation is part of mental discipline.

Ethical conduct is very important in Buddhism. We are challenged to take care in our speech, our actions and our everyday life so as not to harm others and to cultivate safe in ourselves. For example, if we are in a state of anger, we will take steps to let go of our anger before we nuisions other.

We are challenged to practice conscious at all times. Being aware we are clearly present reality, not getting lost in a tangle of troubles, dreams and passions.

Buddhists strive to practice Buddhism at all times.

Of course, we do not all the time necessary to here. But to make this effort is in the heart of Buddhism. Becoming a Buddhist is not a question of accepting a belief system or storage of doctrines. Being Buddhist is to practice Buddhism.